Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Trump Travel Ban: US Issues New Visa Criteria For Six Muslim Nations

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Trump Travel Ban: US Issues New Visa Criteria For Six Muslim Nations

Trump Travel Ban: US Issues New Visa Criteria For Six Muslim Nations


The Trump administration Wednesday, set new criteria for visa applicants from six Muslim nations wherein people and refugees should have a  “close” family or business tie to the United States.

Earlier on Monday, the Supreme Court had partially lifted two lower court injunctions blocking the ban, allowing parts of it to come into effect.

According to the new guidelines, the applicants must prove a relationship with a parent, spouse, child, adult son or daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law or sibling in the US, the Associate Press reported.  The new measures were circulated in the US embassies and consulates Wednesday.

However, extended family like Grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, brothers-laws and sisters-in-law, fiancees or others are not considered to be a close relation.

Foreign nationals from Syria, Iran, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia and Yemen who do not have a “bona fide relationship with any person or entity in the United States” will be barred from entering the US for 90 days, and the ban could come into place within as little as 72 hours of the Supreme Court’s decision. Visas that have already been approved will not be revoked.

The new measures are expected to be implemented Thursday. Senior officials from the departments of State, Justice and Homeland Security are finalising criteria that visitors from six mostly Muslim must meet to avoid the Trump administration’s much-criticised travel ban.

According to news agency AP, the justices’ opinion exempts applicants from the ban if they can prove a “bona fide relationship” with a US person or entity.

Government lawyers must determine how to define such a relationship. The court offered only broad guidelines suggesting it would include a relative, job offer or invitation to lecture in the US.